L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Fellowships

Since 1998, the L’Oréal Corporate Foundation and UNESCO have been committed to increase the number of women working in scientific research. 150 years after Marie Curie’s birth, only 28%* of researchers are women and only 3% of Scientific Nobel Prizes are awarded to them. That is why, for the past 19 years, the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science programme has worked to honour and accompany women researchers at key moments in their careers. Since the programme began, it has supported more than 2,700 young women from 115 countries and celebrated 97 Laureates, at the peak of their careers, including professors Elizabeth H. Blackburn and Ada Yonath, who went on to win a Nobel Prize.

 

In Canada, the program has recognized since 2003 over 65 promising young researchers, whose work contributes to the advancement of therapeutic treatments, to sustainable development, to the survival of our planet, to a better understanding of our universe and to an enhanced comprehension of the very foundation of life.

 2017

remises-de-bourses -LOreal-UNESCO-Pour-les-Femmes-et-la-Science

During a ceremony held on November 6 in conjunction with the North America Gender Summit, five Canadian researchers were honoured and rewarded through the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science program, with the support of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.

 

The 2017 Fellows

The L’Oréal-UNESCO 2017 Excellence in Research Fellowships, each worth $20,000, are awarded to support major postdoctoral research projects undertaken by young Canadians at a pivotal time in their career. They reward excellence and allow top scientists, selected by a panel of experts, to further their research. Ms. Liette Vasseur, President of the Natural, Social and Human Sciences Sectoral Commission of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, had the pleasure to present them to:

Dr. Marie-Ève Lebel, PhD, Post-doctoral Fellow, Melichar Laboratory, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont Research Centre:


Dr. Kelly Suschinsky, PhD, Post-doctoral Fellow, SAGE Laboratory, Queen’s University:

A $10,000 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science – NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplement was awarded by Dr. B. Mario Pinto, president of Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to a Canadian scientist involved in a promising research project, namely:

Dr. Mélanie Françoise Guigueno, NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Natural Resources Sciences, McGill University :

 

To support the mission of the France Canada Research Fund (FCRF), Her Excellency Kareen Rispal, Ambassador to France in Canada, awarded two fellowships of $5,000 each to encourage and develop scientific and university exchanges between France and Canada, in all areas of knowledge, from fundamental science to human and social sciences. The L’Oréal Canada France Canada Research Fund 2017 fellows are:

Ms. Stéphanie Gamache, M.Sc.Erg., Doctoral student at the Université Laval, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration (CIRRIS) and Occupational therapist at the Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de la Capitale Nationale, IRDPQ site, DP Community Integration;

Ms. Danielle McRae, PhD Candidate, Department of Chemistry, Western University.

In his closing remarks, Frank Kollmar, President and CEO of L’Oréal Canada, said: “Tonight, we honor women of science, because the L'Oréal Foundation and UNESCO have a conviction that is also obvious: the world needs science and science needs women, because women of science have the power to change the world. These 5 young researchers represent the future of scientific excellence in Canada and the advancement of our society.”

 


YOUNG RISING TALENTS

That have the power to change the world

The L’Oréal-UNESCO International Rising Talent program is dedicated to both honoring distinguished women scientists as well as supporting promising young women researchers throughout their careers. Fifteen Ph.D. students and post-doctoral Fellows are chosen from among the winners of the 275 fellows selected locally by L’Oréal subsidiaries and UNESCO around the world, these young researchers are indeed the future of science.

The International Rising Talents are already making significant contributions in disciplines as varied as ecology and sustainable development, physics, pharmacology, epidemiology, medical research, neuroscience and evolutionary biology.

 

A Canadian Amongst the 2017 International Rising Talents

Irina Bokova, Directrice Générale de l’UNESCO, Dr. Lorina Naci et M. Jean-Paul Agon, Président-Directeur Général de L’Oréal et Président de la Fondation L’Oréal.

DR LORINA NACI

L’Oréal-UNESCO National Fellowship - Canada

Brain and Mind Institute at the University of Western Ontario 

IN A COMA: IS THE PATIENT CONSCIOUS OR UNCONSCIOUS?

In Canada alone, 1.4 million people are currently living with the consequences of an acquired brain injury, with 50,000 new cases each year. Coma is defined as an acute state of behavioral non-responsiveness in which the patient is thought to lack consciousness or have minimal consciousness. Although patient outcomes vary greatly, there is currently no clinical tool to evaluate whether they will recover or not. This situation poses serious problems – for example, how does a physician know whether to continue with life-sustaining therapies or not, especially in the first 72 hours? Dr Lorina Naci, cognitive neuroscientists at the University of Western Ontario (UWO) is hoping to change the way things are done. She has developed an innovative and powerful technique that can assess preserved brain function in comatose patients. The technique involves the patients listening to a short audio-story while inside an MRI scanner (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). This approach, which allows researchers to visualize cerebral activity, has already succeeded in detecting the signs of consciousness in a patient who has been in a vegetative state for 16 years. Dr Naci’s numerous publications on the subject have attracted the attention of other scientists in the field. “I will now be able to test my method on comatose patients in the intensive care unit - as soon as they arrive, and then one month and six months later,” explains the young scientist. “My goal is to determine the clinical prevalence of covert consciousness and identify novel and objective prognostic markers of recovery in these patients. These studies will not only have profound implications for diagnostics and care, but will also help medical and legal decision-making relating to life after severe brain injury.”

2016 

 

5 outstanding young researchers recognized by L’Oréal Canada
through the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science program

 

During a ceremony held on November 15 at the French embassy in Ottawa, five Canadian researchers were honoured and rewarded through the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science program, with the support of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.

The L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science program was created in 1998 with a simple goal: to ensure that women are equally represented in all scientific disciplines. Since its creation 18 years ago, the program honoured 92 fellows for the excellence of their scientific work and supported 2,438 young women scientists and talented young researchers. These exceptional researchers have helped the world advance, each in her own way.

In Canada, the program recognized over 60 promising young researchers, whose work contributes to the advancement of therapeutic treatments, to the improvement of food supply, to sustainable development, to the survival of our planet, to a better understanding of our universe and to an enhanced comprehension of the very foundation of life.

“The five 2016 fellows are living proof that, despite the obstacles, talent, passion, determination and boldness can change the world”, stated Mr. Frank Kollmar, President and CEO, L’Oréal Canada. “These young Canadian researchers contribute to the advancement of science and knowledge by their exceptional work.”

List of 2016 Fellows

The L’Oréal-UNESCO 2016 Excellence in Research Fellowships, each worth $20,000, are awarded to support major postdoctoral research projects undertaken by young Canadians. They reward excellence and allow top scientists, selected by a panel of experts, to further their research. Ms. Christina Cameron, President of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, had the pleasure to present them to:

Dr. Lorina Naci, PhD, Brain Injury, Cognition, Consciousness, Western University

Dr. Stephanie Vogt, PhD, Microbiology, University of British Columbia

To support the mission of the France Canada Research Fund (FCRF), fellowships of $5,000 each were awarded to encourage and develop scientific and university exchanges between France and Canada in all areas of knowledge, from fundamental science to human and social sciences. The L’Oréal Canada France Canada Research Fund 2016 fellows are:

Ms. Joanna Bundus, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

Ms. Stephanie Kedzior, Chemical Engineering, McMaster University

A $5,000 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science – NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship Supplement was awarded to a Canadian scientist involved in a promising research project, namely:

Dr. Victoria Arbour, NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow, Evolutionary biologist and vertebrate palaeontologist, University of Toronto and Royal Ontario Museum

 

2015 

 

 

L’Oréal Canada reiterates its commitment to women in science

At a ceremony held on January 21 at the French embassy in Ottawa, seven Canadian women researchers were awarded top honors under the L'Oréal Canada For Women in Science Program with the support of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. The partners also took the opportunity to launch L’Oréal Canada For Girls in Science, an initiative to encourage high school girls to pursue careers in science.

Created in 1998 by L'Oréal and UNESCO, For Women in Science is now among the most prestigious programs of its kind. Since its inception, more than 2,250 scientists from over 110 countries have benefited from the program. In addition, national programs have been created in some sixty countries, including L'Oréal Canada For Women in Science in 2003 with the support of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO. Thanks to the program, fellowships have been awarded to nearly 50 exceptional women scientists.

“The 2015 winners of the L’Oréal Canada For Women in Science Program fellowship embody the values of excellence, hard work, and innovation we want to encourage and support, in cooperation with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO,” said Frank Kollmar, President & CEO, L'Oréal Canada. “They are clear proof of the important role of Canadian women scientists, whose exceptional work contributes to the advancement of science and knowledge.”

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Professor Molly S. Shoichet of the University of Toronto was selected by an independent international jury as one of five global laureates (representing North America) for her work in polymer chemistry.

Stay connected on:

Facebook (L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science): https://www.facebook.com/forwomeninscience

Twitter (@4womeninscience): https://twitter.com/4womeninscience

#womeninscience

 

To apply : https://www.univcan.ca/programs-and-scholarships/scholarship-partners-canada/ 

Canadian Commission for UNESCO :  http://unesco.ca/home-accueil/women-in-science

NSERC http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/Students-Etudiants/PD-NP/LOREAL-UNESCO_eng.asp

 FFCR : https://ca.ambafrance.org/Bourses-l-Oreal-UNESCO-pour-les-Femmes-et-la-Science